Where there’s a weirdo, there’s a way: why weird wins over vanilla every time

Michael Lazerow wants you to be weird. Because weird is good. He’s in the right place: he’s at South by Southwest Interactive in Austin, in a vortex chock full of smart chocolate chip weirdos rolled up in a big all of marketer and VC goo. But even burnt — and we are all pretty burnt after three days of non-stop SxSW activities — it’s still tasty.

Michael gets messages late at night from Gary Vanderchuk telling him that he loves him. He offered to pay Michael’s two sons $200 bucks apiece to become Jets fans. (they declined. They came back hard at Gary, asking for $5,000 to switch. Gary came back with a $1,700 offer. See Vimeo for the full story.) He thinks differently. He’s living the life he wants to live. It’s working out just fine. 

(You can read Micheal’s entire post on the topic here: http://www.lazerow.com/2011/09/gary-v-offers-5000-to-cole-myles-to-like-jets.html )

Or take James Atucher (see his Twitter for samples of his tweets: crazy stuff  pops out there at 3 am. https://twitter.com/jaltucher ). He went on television to suggest that everyone should quit their jobs immediately. Since all companies are firing every employee, anyway, just go ahead a quit preemptively …because you should know that employed people are “like the living dead.”

Or consider Cyndy Gallup. Michael says that Cyndy is one of the most successful and happiest people he knows. She’s head of an ad agency. She’s known for her fabulously decorated home in Manhattan. She’s half Chinese, half British and spent some time in the socially oppressive  Brunei. She has a Chanel machine gun art on the wall, a Gucci chainsaw, and erotic Jade sculptures on the coffee table. She got a Ted talk without telling them her topic. She discussed her sexual experiences with men in their early twenties. She observed that young men are so immersed in hard-core porn that they believe that sex, as it is depicted in the fictional world of porn, is reality. This leads to some bizarre and hilarious ideas of how men think they are expected to behave in bed. She launched Make Love, Not Porn, and encourages healthy discussions around the topic of sex. See her Ted Talk on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FV8n_E_6Tpc  (Or check her twitter site https://twitter.com/makelovenotporn )

Michael posted a piece with LinkedIn on why weirdos are better than normal people that got more than 700 comments. Some said that embracing their weirdness was the turning point in their lives, where they really began to live in an authentic way. (Full article is here: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130324141810-1714080-why-weirdos-outperform-normals )

His point is this: everyone is born different. We grow up with some powerful motivators to tuck our heads down, get in line, and fit in. Next thing you know you are a lawyer or an accountant – and then it just gets worse, going forward. Forget passion (unless of course you have a burning desire to operate as a CPA or patent attorney).

During the 1950s,  psychologist Solomon Asch performed a conformity experiment and found that most people were willing to deny the evidence of their own eyes and conform to the incorrect responses of planted subjects who gave the wrong answer deliberately. And you know, intuitively, that you’ve done this yourself, so don’t lie: under the right circumstances, most of us will avoid the confrontation of going against the crowd. (See Wiki on the experiments here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asch_conformity_experiments )

There’s survival at stake on this conformity thing. Growing up, most of us get a LOT of practice at following orders. Stepping out of line is risky. And yet it might be the most important thing you do.

In the Milgram experiment, another classic early psychology research test that is now considered by most to be unethical, subjects were coerced verbally by an authority figure to shock a person, while screams went on the adjacent room. (See wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milgram_experiment ). Turns out that most of us are conditioned to obey.

None of us can sit in judgment on the casual cruelty that goes on all around us – in institutions, in corporations, in any power dynamic where authority is surrendered to another person who tells you what to do. Ethics start with institutional structures, because once the average person is dropped into a structured system, they all pretty much behave the same, whether for good or ill.

So, how could we build in nonconformity into the process of education? Currently, the entire system is set up to drill students on required material for standardized testing and teacher salaries and school system allotments are based upon the results of those tests.

Check out Alfie Kohn: how do grades reduce quality? Grades reduce an interest in learning; they encourage you to pick easy tasks, easy classes, instead of taking on challenges where failure is possible, and they encourage lazy thought. The end product, for society, is an army of average Joes, doing the same thing day after day, performing  Homer Simpson quality work, and drifting from one low expectation to another until they drop into the grave. (See Kohn’s article: http://www.alfiekohn.org/teaching/tcag.htm )

Look at how conformity has affected music, something we used to think was a place where you might expect to encounter creativity. Now, a huge contingent of listeners are hearing the same top 40 songs on Spotify.

So, how did all this boring stuff happen? The sad answer: chasing the brass ring.

Americans have become excellent at being average. How do we get out of this situation? Try getting in touch with your inner weirdness.  Find out what makes you NOT a commodity, what makes you special and unique, give that weirdness a big hug, and don’t be afraid to stick out. Because being weird is better. And being weird is easier. Because you get to be yourself. At last.

So, how can we, as individuals, deal with the pressure and the challenges? Michael gave us a  bullet list on what being a weirdo could look like (in bullet points):

  • Social influence: weirdos are comfortable sticking out in a crowd. They are comfortable about who they are.
  • Influence: weirdos are willing to question common beliefs publicity with conviction.
  • Authority: weirdos listen to their gut and are follow their nose, motivated by their own desires and unafraid to pursue their dreams.
  • And do it now. There’s never been a better time to stand up for your own weird self.

So, to get back to James Atucher: is it time to quit your job? What would be an authentic life – for you?

Links

More images from 2014 South by Southwest Interactive
http://www.flickr.com/photos/clairwiloh/sets/72157642467963724/

http://eventifier.co/event/sxsw14/photos

2014 SxSW Interactive Presentations on Soundcloud 

https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/sets/sxsw-interactive-2014

Find out more about the South by Southwest Interactive Conference in Austin Texas

http://sxsw.com/

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Personal tracking with Ed Hunsinger: part big data, all man

Playing with your own big data: Ed Hunsinger at South by Southwest Interactive 2013. 

Ed Hunsinger: part man, part machine; does this equal…cyborg? Not quite. It’s all perfectly normal and you will see more and more 2000 Men and Women soon, tracking their bodies’ performances with data selfies, using such devices at FitBit,( http://www.fitbit.com/ ), Storm, latitude tracking, RunKeeper (http://runkeeper.com/ ), Foursquare (https://foursquare.com/‎ ) to post and track your own whereabouts,  and a blithering host of apps that allow you to monitor every square inch you occupy and every breath you take.

Hunsinger is tracking his body and everything he does, and he’s leveraging SPlunk, his company’s IT log analysis software, in this project. He’s pulling down Twitter data and analyszing it with SPlunk.

There’s tons of apps that you can use to gather data, Hunsinger said, highlighting Bioblogger as one app worth testing out. The challenges lay in pulling the date out of the apps and tracking sites and massing it to measure and track the aggregate data.

“I want millions of data points, ” Hunsinger said, darkly hinting at APIs and ISO time-date stamps and a script he wrote to pull data from FitBit. For those who want to play along, check his Github, which is under the name Ed Rabbit. Look for biblogger.

Hunsinger noted that the act of tracking data affects the data. So he tries to work with trackers that collect data passively, as much as that is possible.  He directed interested parties to look into Lumo (LumoLift, LumoBack) and ZEO (now defunct: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeo,_Inc. ).

You put on the headset, hit button, and the device knows when you dreams at night and when you are awake. Hunsinger uses a six-month battery on the device so that it runs passively without needing his attention.

He challenges developers to come up with more effective tracking and reporting software, apps that work silently to gather data.

May the best software win. And let the Data Hunger games begin.

Links

More images from 2013 South by Southwest Interactive
http://www.flickr.com/photos/clairwiloh/sets/72157632980772104/

http://eventifier.co/event/sxsw13/clairwil

2013 SxSW Interactive Presentations on Soundcloud 

https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/sets/sxsw-interactive-2013

Find out more about the South by Southwest Interactive Conference in Austin Texas

http://sxsw.com/interactive

Shut up and take my money: John Biehler and 3D printing

What John Biehler said when he saw Pre Pettis and MakerBot on The Daily Show

How 3D Printing Changed John Biegher’s Life

John Biehler bought a 3D printer as soon as he saw one demonstrated on The Daily Show. He’s been experimenting with it and extending what can be done with it ever since. Biehler formed a forum for 3D printers – 3D604.org (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/3d604 ) – and the forum is burgeoning with inventors and interesting conversations about the endless possibilities these devices present.

John Biehler at the 2013 South by Southwest Interactive Conference in Austin Texas

He brought a 3D printer to the 3D Printer Village in Vancouver at the 2013 Maker Faire (http://www.vancouvermakerfoundation.org/events-and-programs/vancouver-mini-maker-faire/ ) and particularly enjoyed the reaction children have to the device.

“They see it and realize it can make toys and parts to build with. Then they basically say ‘get out of the way’ start they start using the printer. They want one now.”

It turns out that an Xbox with Xbox Connect can be turned into a 3D scanner. This is a good thing. Connect a 3D scanner device to a 3D printer device and what is the first thing you do with it? Apparently, you make people; that’s what Biehler did.

“We scanned people and printed their faces and heads.”

Dita Von Teese in a 3D printed, fully articulated printed dress. 

 

Links

3D604.org group  https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/3d604

More images from 2013 South by Southwest Interactive
http://www.flickr.com/photos/clairwiloh/sets/72157632980772104/

http://eventifier.co/event/sxsw13/clairwil

2013 SxSW Interactive Presentations on Soundcloud 

https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/sets/sxsw-interactive-2013

Find out more about the South by Southwest Interactive Conference in Austin Texas

http://sxsw.com/interactive

DIY comics artist Jody Culkin: Making and Drawing Comics in a Makers World

Jody Culkin, artist in a variety of media, speaking at South by Southwest Interactive 2013 in Austin Texas

Lasersaurs, science geek comics, comic book how-to’s on lasers, creative uses of IPhone cameras, hacking, soldering, coloring books on electronics, rapid development of instructional manuals using photo-comics—Jody Culkin brought many (pardon the art pun) graphic examples in a slide show presentation on DIY comics to a South by Southwest Interactive Conference audience.

Jody Culkin, a teacher in the Multimedia Program at CUNY’s Manhattan Community College, is an artist in a variety of media, including comics, photography, mixed media, installations and much more. She’s shown her sculptures, photographs and new media pieces at museums and galleries throughout this country and internationally.

Culkin suggested the use of comics, with their straightforward images and text, to assist with the development of an idea from a prototype to a finished product. And why not use comics for product—hardware or software— documentation?

Making your own fun

Tools: if you have the money or access via work or school, it’s certainly possible to use professional, expensive tools like Adobe’s Illustrator and InDesign for comics, there are plenty of no- or low-cost tools that can be applied to DIY comics. Comic Life, while not open source, integrates well with photos and is wired in with IPhoto if you use it to organize images.

Gimp, an open-source tool similar to Photoshop, can be used for pixel-based, as opposed to vector-based art and it’s available for Mac, PC, and Linux. Gimp has a lively community of users. Find out more about Gimp at http://www.gimp.org/

And for open-source vector-based art creation, consider Inkscape:   http://inkscape.org/en/

Culkin listed sites where science, electronics, DIY toy creation…..

Perhaps the best way to experience what the artist brought to the audience would be to review her event slides, which she posted in SlideShare. What a great idea, eh, for a DIY comics outsider artist, to give us an easy way to take in the ideas and images? Bravo, Culkin!  http://www.slideshare.net/jodyhc/culkin-diycomicssxswi2013

Links

Links from her slides in graphic form.

More images from 2013 South by Southwest Interactive

2013 SxSW Interactive Presentations on Soundcloud 

Find out more about the South by Southwest Interactive Conference in Austin Texas

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